Practice Production Project

Welcome to the AIM Practice Production Project!

Practice Production Projects are regularly scheduled field and studio productions intended to help producers and volunteers stay active in the AIM production community, after completing their basic production workshops.  Practice Production Projects are supervised by AIM production staff and generally consist of, a pre-production meeting, and a single production date, followed by a screening and celebration of your work.

Once registered for a project, participants are required to attend the pre-production meeting.  At this meeting, participants will be introduced to the project’s producer, and will collectively draft a production plan.  An AIM instructor will be in attendance to provide any additional assistance needed.

PDF icon Outline for Studio Practice Production (PDF)
PDF icon Outline for Field Practice Production (PDF)

The subject of the project will be chosen by the producer and will be presented to the team at the pre-production meeting.  Click here for the list of possible subjects. 

Crew positions will be assigned during the pre-production meeting.  All crew members will earn 2 volunteer hours for the pre-production meeting, and up to 6 hours on the date of the production. In addition, members participate in 4 Practice Production Projects, serving in different crew positions, will earn a bonus of 20 volunteer hours. 

NOTE: YOU MUST BE CERTIFIED IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE!    **What if I'm not certified?**

REGISTER FOR UPCOMING PRACTICE PRODUCTION PROJECTS

Field Project (18-B)
Pre-production meeting - Apr 7
Production date - Apr 21

Studio Project (18-B) 
Pre-production meeting - Apr 7
Production date - Apr 21

 

Field Crew Positions

Producer = The producer initiates, supervises, and coordinates matters such as finding crew and talent, reserving facilities, picking locations, and set design. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the production process, from development to completion of a project.

Director = The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a program, including controlling the content and flow of the program's progression, directing the performances of actors, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film's soundtrack. 

Camera Operator = The camera operator uses the camera at the direction of the director to capture the scenes on video. 

Audio Engineer = The audio engineer is responsible for the operation of the audio mixer and microphones on set. They select which microphones will be used for each program segment and mix each device in real time into single track that will be used in editing. It is also their responsibility to correct troublesome noises or artifacts that any audio devices could be causing.

Lighting Technician = The lighting technician is the head of the lighting department, responsible for the design of the lighting plan for a production. 

Grip = Grips are trained lighting and rigging technicians. Their main responsibility is to work closely with the lighting and camera departments to put the non-electrical components of lighting set-ups required for a shot, such as flags, overheads, and bounces. They also move and adjust major set pieces when something needs to be moved to get a camera into position.  

 

Studio Crew Positions

Producer = The producer initiates, supervises, and coordinates matters such as finding crew and talent, reserving facilities, picking locations, and set design. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the production process, from development to completion of a project.

Director = The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a program, including controlling the content and flow of the program's progression, directing the performances of actors, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film's soundtrack.

Technical Director = The technical director (TD) has overall responsibility for the operation of the video switcher by instruction of the director.   

Lighting Technician = The lighting technician helps establish the theme and appearance of the show by regulating the lighting for every scene and strives to match the project's visual appearance to the director's vision. 

Camera Operator = The camera operator uses the camera at the direction of the director to capture the scenes on video.

Floor Director = The floor director represents the director on the studio floor and relays instructions to cast and crew. They also check that the floor is clear and safe for the performance, checks that scenery and set pieces are ready, makes announcements on set overall.  Lastly, they are in charge of maintaining silence and order, calls cues, and prompts for talents as required.

Audio Engineer = The audio engineer is responsible for the operation of the audio mixer and microphones on set. They select which microphones will be used for each program segment and mix each device in real time into single track that will be used in editing. It is also their responsibility to correct troublesome noises or artificats that any audio devices could be causing.

Character Generator = The character generator prepares and displays digital on-screen graphics for production. 

Teleprompter Operator = The teleprompter operator prepares the script used during a production and controls the speed at which it is displayed for talent on set.

Once completed, your projects will be passed on to an editor and prepped for a premiere screening to celebrate your success!

 

REGISTER FOR UPCOMING PRACTICE PRODUCTION PROJECTS

Field Project (18-B)
Pre-production meeting - Feb 17
Production date - March 3

Studio Project (18-B) 
Pre-production meeting - Apr 7
Production date - Apr 21